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A recent feature article from Dictionary.com explains the difference between the idiom “my apologies”, and the literal expression of “my apologies”. If you are among the majority of us who don’t know the difference, you may enjoy following the link below to read more about it.

At West Georgia Eye Care Center “our apologies” are of the literal kind!

We are sorry for the confusion about insurance issues in the New Year.   Last week we shared that most of the problems you experience with your insurance providers are problems for us too.  Insurance companies formulate their own rules and regulations.  Medical providers have to follow them.  We want to help you see the light at the end of the insurance tunnel and will try our best to assist with questions and concerns.

One comment that some of you have shared with us is your frustration with increased waiting times in January.  It is true that appointments often take a little longer in January.  At the first of the New Year patients are providing new information and updates to their accounts.  Many patients also have questions about their changes and need additional counseling or instruction.  Serving each of you individually with the best care possible can create longer waiting times overall.

Eye exams add insult to injury.! ( That is another idiom, by the way!)  The elements of a thorough eye exam often include special tests and dilation.  The very natures of these specialized features of eye exams are time sensitive.  Many eye exams cannot be completed until dilation is completed.  Some tests require complete dilation while others must be performed before dilation.  We know that your time is valuable, and with concern for that,  we do our best to make your visit as efficient as possible.  Extended time in a waiting room is no one’s idea of a good time, including us!  Adding waiting time to confusing insurance issues can make January seem like an “adding insult to injury” sort of month!

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